WNYLRC Workshop: Games and Design in Your Library!          May, 22, 2017
Monday, May 22, 2017
Date:
Monday, May 22, 2017
9:30 am to 3:30 pm

Price (Governing):
$20
Price (Affiliate Member):
$25
Price (Patron Organizational):
$25
Price (Patron Student):
$20
Price (Patron Personal Member):
$20
Price (Non-Member):
$30
Price (Other NY 3Rs Library Member):
$25
Price (WNYLRC Staff):
$0

Location:
WNYLRC Training Center

Description:

How can games, play and game design help support programs and initiatives in your library? How do a collection of jigsaw puzzles, My Little Ponies, or diaries illuminate cultural history? What can they teach us?

The session begins with an introduction to addressing the “big questions” that help us decide why we might want to make game playing and game design part of library programs and services.

Beth Lathrop, Director of Libraries at The Strong, discusses the evolution of the museum’s mission and collections and explores how its archival collections, museum objects, and unique primary source materials can inform or inspire your library’s game design programs.

Following this, Brian Mayer, Gaming and Library Technology Specialist for the School Library System of the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership will carry some of Beth’s ideas forward as he helps participants build some exposure and comfort with non-digital game design as a potential tool for supporting programs and curriculum needs in different types of libraries, for both formal and informal learning goals.

 

Brian will take them through the relevance of analog games to library programming priorities, whether in a public, school or even academic library setting: for building content knowledge, literacy skills or plain personal enjoyment and socialization.

 

Attendees will start by exploring pre-existing games to build a familiarity with modern designs and build a toolkit for to draw from for their own designs. Participants will be shown varying approaches to design: fixing games, modifying existing games, and original design. For example, with modifying existing designs a student can focus on the exploration and application of curriculum rather than creating and refining a new design. The group will also explore escape rooms and puzzle boxes as another programming opportunity, where players can explore and engage through puzzles and play.

The discussion will also talk about community partnerships, where library patrons of all ages are encouraged to design games to support local museums, parks or businesses. Also, reversing that, partnering with local business to bring support to the work students or others are doing in game design: graphic design, printing and rendering, or drawing primary sources or specialized information to help support designing.

Attendees will finish the session by brainstorming and begin to work, with guidance, on the beginnings of their own designs which they can take back to continue development or begin to implement.

Intended outcomes:

            Develop greater understanding of basic game design concepts

Demonstrate connections between game design and 21st century learning skills and content and,

Demonstrate game design as a tool for both lesson planning and assessment

            Explore ways to connect game design to learning outcomes, both formal and informal

            Create a personalized “toolkit” for attendees own specific outcomes for game design

Beth Lathrop is Director of Libraries at The Strong where she oversees the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play and Grada Hopeman Gelser circulating library. Prior to joining The Strong in 2014, Lathrop worked for more than 15 years in public libraries in Virginia, South Carolina, and New York. Lathrop is a graduate of James Madison University and holds a master’s degree in library science from the University at Buffalo. She also holds a certificate in nonprofit management from St. John Fisher College.

Brian Mayer is a library technology specialist for Genesee Valley BOCES, an educational services agency that supports the libraries of twenty-two small, rural districts in western New York, as well as an independent library consultant on gaming in libraries. His focus is on modern board games and putting authentic games into educational settings to engage students with the curriculum. He has been instrumental in the growth of designer games as educational resources and has written several documents aligning games with national and state standards. He is the author of many articles on gaming in libraries . Mayer earned his elementary teaching certification at Buffalo State and his MLS at the University of Buffalo. He is also the co-author (with Christopher Harris) of the book, Libraries Got Game: Aligned Learning through Modern Board Games (pub. 2010. He is also the designer of the award winning board game Freedom: The Underground Railroad and was named a 2015 Library Journal Mover and Shaker for his work utilizing games in education.

***We will end the day with a raffle give-away of several select board games!!!

Directions:
CE Workshop:
Yes
CE Hours:
0.5
Workshop Length:
5
Speaker Name:
Beth Lathrop and Brian Mayer
Speaker Bio:

Beth Lathrop

 

Beth Lathrop is Director of Libraries at The Strong where she oversees the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play and Grada Hopeman Gelser circulating library. Prior to joining The Strong in 2014, Lathrop worked for more than 15 years in public libraries in Virginia, South Carolina, and New York. Lathrop is a graduate of James Madison University and holds a master’s degree in library science from the University at Buffalo. She also holds a certificate in nonprofit management from St. John Fisher College.

 

Brian Mayer

 

Brian Mayer is a gaming and library technology specialist who works with 22 school districts across 5 counties in rural Western New York. He collaborates with classroom teachers and school librarians to incorporate games, game experiences and game design into the classroom to support state and national learning standards. Brian writes, speaks and does workshops on the value and application of games in education and is co-author of several books and numerous articles on the subject. He is also the designer of the award winning board game Freedom: The Underground Railroad and was named a 2015 Library Journal Mover and Shaker for his work utilizing games in education.

Max Class Size:
25